A place for interesting beer-related articles.

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Jeremy Dunn
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Re: A place for interesting beer-related articles.

Post by Jeremy Dunn » Thu Apr 12, 2018 4:08 pm

Some new recipes from Jester King:

https://jesterkingbrewery.com/blog/homebrew-recipes
Jeremy Dunn

Jeremy Dunn
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Re: A place for interesting beer-related articles.

Post by Jeremy Dunn » Sat Apr 14, 2018 2:57 pm

Jeremy Dunn

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Dutch
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Re: A place for interesting beer-related articles.

Post by Dutch » Mon May 21, 2018 10:10 pm

Check out Great Lakes International Cider And Perry Competition GLINTCAP.com
Dutch deHaan • OVHA Board Member


Twenty-four hours in a day, twenty-four beers in a case - COINCIDENCE?

Jeremy Dunn
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Re: A place for interesting beer-related articles.

Post by Jeremy Dunn » Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:29 am

Apparently hops themselves have enzymes to convert dextrins to sugar...

https://www.scientificamerican.com/podc ... ops-along/

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jafc.8b03563
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Tom Wrinkles
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Re: A place for interesting beer-related articles.

Post by Tom Wrinkles » Mon Jul 13, 2020 2:11 pm

Interesting article on diacetyl.

[https://www.whitelabs.com/beer/diacetyl ... rmentation.][/url]
Tom Wrinkles

Bottled/Kegged: Nothing :cry:
Fermenting : Doppelbock
Next up: Cream Ale

Jordan Fehr
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Re: A place for interesting beer-related articles.

Post by Jordan Fehr » Mon Jul 13, 2020 8:52 pm

Definitely a component of my brewing that I would love to eliminate, always tend to have at least a little Diacetyl in my maltier beers and acetaldehyde in my hoppier beers. I feel like aeration is where I'm lacking. What do you think?
"Brew what you love, love what you brew."

On tap: Black Saison - Red IPA
Fermenting: Vienna Lager

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Tom Wrinkles
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Re: A place for interesting beer-related articles.

Post by Tom Wrinkles » Tue Jul 14, 2020 9:58 am

Jordan Fehr wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 8:52 pm
Definitely a component of my brewing that I would love to eliminate, always tend to have at least a little Diacetyl in my maltier beers and acetaldehyde in my hoppier beers. I feel like aeration is where I'm lacking. What do you think?
I am by no means an expert so, here is a quote from Stone Brewery.

"For the next part of our guide to off-flavors we'll take a look at acetaldehyde, with persistance and consistency you can avoid this undesireable quality.

Acetaldehyde smells and tastes like green apples. Sometimes it’s described as “oxidized apples” or “acetic cider”.

How does it form in beer?

Acetaldehyde is the immediate precursor to ethanol in fermentation. Like diacetyl, acetaldehyde is found in large quantities during early fermentation as the yeast produces it en masse early in their metabolic cycle. If there is a high amount of dissolved oxygen present in the young beer, then the oxygen could react with ethanol and oxidize it back into acetaldehyde.

Acetaldehyde is also formed during too long sitting on the yeast. When yeast health is poor, cells can die and burst open (autolysis) which releases a lot of acetaldehyde into the beer. This is why it is important to stick to a strict yeast dumping regimen during aging, and avoid the heavy buildup of yeast in the cone of the fermentor.

How do you solve the problem?

Just like diacetyl, kraeusening is the best way to remove excess acetaldehyde. Brewers need to make sure that they aren’t removing the beer before fermentation has finished. Raising the fermentation temperature a few degrees (diacetyl rest) will help resolve acetaldehyde issues. The other cause of acetaldehyde is too much dissolved oxygen in the beer. Brewers need to make sure that oxygen inclusion is minimal during the brewing process and any cellar activities (i.e. dry hopping).
Tom Wrinkles

Bottled/Kegged: Nothing :cry:
Fermenting : Doppelbock
Next up: Cream Ale

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